You Pretend to Know Me – This is Why You Are Unemployed

Earlier this month, I received an unsolicited e-mail from a job seeker about an hour after posting for a specific job in New York City.  No problem – right?  I mean I’m trying to fill the job…so what’s wrong with that.  Nothing, generally…except for the fact that this job seeker pretended to personally know me!

Here’s the e-mail!

Hi Mike
Im not sure if you remember me, but I just wanted to say keep up the
phenomenal work. We should reconnect if time allows. I started grad
school, studying Psychology at Brooklyn College in my 2nd semester.
Im still in Philadelphia though, I commute to NY the nights I have
class, Its terrible driving 2 hours each way, but I decided not to
move without having a job in NY first. So Im in NY every Tuesday
Thursday, Lets get together soon if you are available and in the area.
email me here or my mobile XXX-XXX-XXXX Keep me in mind should you have
any HR related openings.

(- Hope the photo helps put a face with the email)

First – thanks for recognizing that my work is phenomenal!  Second – let me introduce you to the apostrophe! And ok – so the poor thing is doing a crazy commute to NYC from Philly for school.  I guess there are no schools in Philadelphia.  That’s gotta be tough.  It’s the last line in the paragraph when she really gets to the point.  “Keep me in mind should you have any HR related openings.”  And notice the last line – she posted a photo of herself to make it seem even more like she really knew me.  Here’s the picture with the head removed to protect her privacy!

I don't know you.

One of my weird skills is that I remember everyone.  Always name, usually face.  When I first got her e-mail I knew that I did not know her name – plus it is a somewhat unique name.  When I popped open the picture – I was absolutely sure of the fact that I had never met this woman.

So I wrote her back:

Dear XXXXX:

 Thank you for reaching out.  I apologize, but I do not recognize your name or photo – how do we know each other?

Best regards,

Mike

She wrote back claiming to have been an intern at a place I used to work about 8 years ago in Boston.   I asked her for her resume, and she sent it and of course the “internship” was on there.  But so was her high school, and dates of attendance of high school (2001 – 2005).  She graduated from high school in Philadelphia in 2005 and wants me to believe she commuted to Boston for an internship at a small no-name non-profit in Boston when she was a sophomore?  You have got to be kidding me.

Needless to say, that was my last bit of correspondence with this one.  To be honest, it kind of freaked me out and made me wonder if all this “sharing” through social media (LinkedIn, etc.) is a good thing – I mean – essentially, she was able to look at my LinkedIn profile (which she did) and completely make up a story about how we “knew” each other.

This is why you are unemployed!

Advertisements

Guest Post: Dear Recruiters – Help Me, Help You! (by Mark Campanale)

I love LinkedIn. There are so many powerful tools in this one community that can help you meet new people, reconnect with business contacts, and get questions answered by people you’ve never met who are willing to help you, even earn new business and find a job.

What LinkedIn is not for is – unsolicited spamming. I’ll explain:

Earlier this month, I put myself back on the job market.  I changed my contact settings to include ‘interested in career opportunities’.  My friends and connections were more than happy to help me in my search and gave me some fantastic referrals.  However, this also opened the door for phone calls like this:

Recruiter:“HI Mark! Your resume just came across my desk, and I have the perfect opportunity for you.”

q
 
Me: “I’m sorry, I didn’t catch your name and who you are with.”

Recruiter: “This is (doesn’t matter) and I’m from So-and-So Recruitment.”

Me: “Hmm. I didn’t send your firm a resume.  Can you tell me how you found it?”

Recruiter: “I saw your status on LinkedIn that you were looking and we have lots of jobs that you may be interested in.”

The biggest issue here is that the job(s) this person was calling me for had nothing to do with my experience.  My profile clearly defines me as a social media and marketing professional and NOT someone interested in entry-level insurance sales with no experience necessary.  This particular recruiter could have benefited if they had tried to get to know me by:

  • Viewing my profile for ‘fit’
  • Seeing if we had any contacts in common, and asked for a referral
  • Sending me an InMail with an introduction to warm up their cold call

And even if I wasn’t a fit, maybe I know someone who is!  LinkedIn is about building solid, professional relationships. As of this posting, I have 496 connections which equal approximately 6.5 million professionals in my network. I am far more inclined to take an appointment when someone is referred by one of my trusted contacts. It happens all the time – it’s why LinkedIn is so powerful and has been around for so long because it PRODUCES ROI!

There are some AMAZING recruiters on the web (Tim Walsh, David Graziano) who truly get that personal branding and positioning yourself as a trusted advisor are the best ways to earn business.

The take away is, don’t lurk; don’t think the answer to somebody’s question is your services. Find a way to connect with prospects through your contacts. You’ll earn more than new business; you’ll earn trust, which, in business, is the most valuable tool you can use.

This is my profile: http://www.linkedin.com/in/markcampanale

Feel free to see whom we have in common or who you may know that can introduce us. I’m always willing to help other’s succeed in business.

Your comments are greatly appreciated.

This guest blog is from Mark Campanale of the Ultimate Customer Experience blog

%d bloggers like this: