4 Ways to Use Your Annual Review to Build Your Brand

At this time of year, many companies are undergoing their annual performance review processes. While the value of performance reviews, as we’ve come to know them, can be debated, a review presents the perfect opportunity for you to enhance your brand with your boss, and with the company.

Dress Up – I used to manage someone who always dressed up for his performance reviews.  At first I thought it was funny, and said to him “you don’t need to dress up for this!”  He replied that he really valued his review and felt it was a good time to put his best foot forward. Dressing up is a great way to show your boss that you take the meeting seriously and value the time.

Be Open to Feedback – Go in to your review expecting that your boss has some constructive feedback for you. Don’t be defensive and start making excuses for things you need to work on. Even if you don’t agree, it won’t do your reputation any good to get into a debate.

Share Your Goals – Your annual review is a perfect opportunity for you to think and talk bigger picture. Let your boss know how you would like to grow over the next year. Maybe there are special projects you’d like to get involved with, take this chance to show your boss that you’re thinking about the future and how you can make a bigger impact at the company.

Give Thanks – Show appreciation to your boss for taking the time to have this kind of meeting with you.  Good bosses put a lot of effort into reviews – writing comments, ratings, and preparing for the conversation. Giving thanks will show your boss that you value their opinion and appreciate their time.

In the fast-paced world at which we all move, the opportunity to have a dedicated discussion with our boss about our own performance is rare. Take advantage of this opportunity, put your best foot forward and build that brand of yours!

What other ideas do readers have to improve their brand during their performance review?

This post originally appeared on the Personal Branding Blog

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Building Your Brand While Working Remotely

As the footprint of companies spreads geographically, today, more and more workers are working remotely, rather than in a corporate office.  While telecommuting can bring benefits, like flexible work hours, it can also prove challenging when it comes to building your personal brand internally at your company.

So how can remote workers enhance their brand?

  • Visit headquarters as much as possible.  Take advantage of opportunities to travel to corporate for meetings or training. Encourage your boss to advocate for this type of travel. When it comes down to it – positive face-to-face interactions are your number one way to build your brand. When visiting headquarters – do your best to make connections. Grab lunch with the head of marketing, or drinks after work with a VP of some sort.
  • Shine at company gatherings. Even for remote employees, there are typically some opportunities for in-person interactions. Whether it be a regional sales meeting or representing your company at a trade show with other employees. Use these opportunities to socialize and build connections.
  • Pick up the phone.  Don’t just send e-mails all the time. It can be difficult to build your network through e-mail alone. Instead of always sending e-mails, call people on the phone – and encourage people to call you.
  • Video conference.  Again, there’s nothing like looking someone in the eye when building solid connection. Better than a phone call – use tools like FaceTime or Skype to have video conferences instead.
  • Be active in company-driven social media. If your company is using social media tools like LinkedIn groups or Twitter to build their brand, see how you can get involved by participating. If your company is using internal social media tools like wikis, blogs, or Yammer – put yourself out there by sharing market or trend information.

While being a remote worker makes it a bit more challenging to build your brand within your company, it’s not a possible endeavor.  If you are, or have been, a remote worker – what are some of the strategies you’ve employed to build your reputation with your organization?

This post originally appeared on Personal Branding Blog.

7 Things Confidential Job Postings Say About Your Company

I always snicker and shake my head when I see a job posting listed as “Company Confidential“.  “Don’t these people get it?” I say to myself.

A job posting is one of the most frequent forms of advertising your company – and perhaps the number one way to represent your employment brand – you know -the image you project as to whether your company is a good place to work or not?  By publishing your job postings confidentially, you not only miss the opportunity to spread your employment brand, but you actually hurt it!  Plus, you’ll just delay the time it takes you to fill with your really bad version of grown up Hide and Seek.  Here’s what posting your open jobs confidentially  says about you:

  1. You don’t get talent! Candidates are leery about applying for confidential postings.  You’ll potentially miss out on the one by hiding who you are.
  2. You’re sneaky!  Do you already have someone in this role and you want to try and back fill them before they are out the door?  Would you post my job without talking to me someday? Are you conducting interviews in dark alleys?
  3. You’re ashamed! What are you hiding?  Shouldn’t the name of your company draw in applicants?
  4. You’re cowardly! Are you trying to avoid internal applications and the difficult conversations associated with having to let someone down?
  5. You’re old school! You think people should be lucky to work for you and have no other options.
  6. You’re not resourceful! You’re missing out on referrals from your employees and network.
  7. You’re lazy! You don’t want to “waste your time” wading through so many resumes so why not limit the amount you receive?

Sure, we can think of benefits to posting jobs confidentially…I’m talking to you staffing agencies who can’t hunt us down and blow up our phones…but the benefits nowhere near outweigh the detriment to your employment brand and your talent acquisition strategy in the global fight for talent.  Post confidentially, and you’ll enjoy less resumes, less talent,  and longer time to fill.  Enjoy!

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